Michael Jordan

America Should Salute, Not Berate, Gabby Douglas

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Gabby Douglas became the face of U.S. gymnastics after capturing hearts across the world, and a couple of gold medals, during the 2012 London Olympics. Her status and fame made her seem a lot bigger than just her 5-foot-2 frame.

Fast forward four years later to this year’s games at Rio, where Douglas and her teammates struck gold yet again in team competition. However, this time around, Douglas has been shrunk down by the American public and placed under the microscope, with criticism and torment launched at her for every move she makes.

Douglas has been unfairly targeted and disparaged by some members of American society that deem her “unpatriotic.”

On August 9, the “Final Five”–the nickname given to the team of U.S. gymnasts composed of Douglas, Aly Raisman, Simone Biles, Laurie Hernandez, and Madison Kocian–stood atop of the Olympic podium, as they listened to the Star-Spangled Banner play throughout the arena.

It was a beautiful moment for a team whose 8.2 point difference over second-place Russia, the largest margin of victory in 56 years, capped off a successful title defense.

However, some armchair and couch-sitting “Olympians,” watching from their households back in the United States, noticed something that made them furious. Something that enraged them enough to mock, berate, and bully Douglas on social media.

Four out of five members of the Final Five had their hands placed on their hearts as the national anthem played. The last person didn’t–that person being Douglas.

To them, the golden moment was tarnished, and it was only the beginning of the attacks towards Douglas.

Since then, she’s still receiving hate-filled, racially-charged insults for her behavior on the podium, comments on her hair, and being called selfish for not cheering on her teammates “hard enough.”

Douglas should not apologize to these critics, but she did–all before sobbing privately after the press conference.

She is the one donning the red, white, and blue. She trained to represent Team USA. Her gold medal performances in London seemed long forgotten. She helped her team win again for the United States.

Yet, she’s getting unfair criticism from those who are sitting at home. The ones who didn’t train at the highest level to represent their country at the world’s biggest stage. From people who didn’t sacrifice hours and years of their childhood to train in order to fulfill an Olympic-sized dream.

Douglas didn’t do anything disrespectful, she stood at attention. She hasn’t cheated, used performance-enhancing drugs, or sabotage her fellow competitors. She won gold for the United States fair and square.

Go to any major sporting event nowadays and you will see that a majority of people don’t put their hands over their hearts while the Star-Spangled Banner plays. Others don’t even remove their hats. Some are giving their orders at concession stands or walking to the bathroom.

Why is this a big deal?

In the 2012 London games, McKayla Maroney became famous for her unamused scowl, as she stood with her arms crossed on the podium. No one criticized her then. In fact, she became a viral internet meme, a hilarious joke that was celebrated.

Michael Phelps laughed during a medal ceremony last week while the national anthem played because of an inside joke between him and his friends. The joke involved the Baltimore tradition of screaming “O!” during the anthem. His hometown pride was appreciated. No one called him un-American for laughing.

The 1992 Dream Team–regarded by many as the best basketball team to ever grace the hardwood–only had a couple of its members salute the flag while standing on the podium. 11 of the 12 players on that team became legendary Hall of Famers.

Chris Mullin, Scottie Pippen, Charles Barkley, Patrick Ewing, and Michael Jordan–yes, his Airness–are among some of the Dream Teamers who did not salute the flag. They didn’t get criticism.

This is not a knock on any of the aforementioned athletes; they have achieved gold medals in the name of the United States. It’s more of a critique on how the American people received them in comparison to how some are treating Douglas.

She stood respectfully during the anthem. She did not gesture wildly, flip off audiences, or dance gleefully for winning a gold medal. She didn’t showboat, nor were there any displays of bad sportsmanship or treason.

Why should Douglas be held to an unfair double standard?

At 20 years old, she’s considered old in the sport of gymnastics but still very young in the game of life.

Maybe it’s her youth that make some people feel the need to give patriarchal or parental advice, with adults feeling the need to impose their wisdom on a younger Douglas. Based on looking at some of the tweets on social media, it’s clear that some of the vitriol is racially motivated.

Let’s face it, women are looked at much more closely in regards to their appearance, how they compose themselves, and how they act in comparison to men. They are judged a lot more for their behaviors. Throw race into the picture and the magnitude increases, especially given the racial tensions that are prominent in the news and today’s society.

Regardless of what the motive may be, whether it may be related to gender, racial, or just an overall disdain for Douglas, only one thing should matter in an American and Olympic context–the colors red, white, and blue.

Unfortunately, it isn’t that simple. While some have voiced their support for Douglas, using the hashtag #LOVE4GABBYUSA or through other means over social media, the positive messages won’t stop the continued downpour of venomous messages from pundits.

The only unpatriotic act that has been committed in all of this mess are from those who wish to see her fail.

Shame on them.

Douglas continues to compete, despite the negativity. She could have withdrew from her events, give in, and make it about herself.

But she didn’t.

She isn’t the one being un-American. Those that go out of their way to wish for ill will on Douglas, who has won gold in the name of the stars and stripes, are the ones who disrespect the flag.

They owe an apology.

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The Puck Stops Here

I spent the early afternoon yesterday watching my Penguins take on the perennial powerhouse Chicago Blackhawks.  The game was a thriller, though my Pens would ultimately fall short in a shootout 2-1.  Despite a wealth of elite talent on both sides, the red sirens rang merely twice in 65 minutes (the third goal being an arbitrary goal given to the Hawks for winning the shootout).  This got me thinking that the Sunday matinee might be a microcosm of a league-wide issue on a much larger scale.  It is no secret that hockey is the lowest scoring of our four major sports.  However, the rapid decline in goals over the years could be cause for concern.

 

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Why is this a problem, you ask?  It becomes a dilemma of attracting new fans for the league, which is more readily accomplished via gaudy stats.  The NFL has become stringent (at times to a fault) in recent seasons in its calls on defensive backs.  Though the hardcore fan pines for lenience in this regard, the league just keeps chugging along, aided by its newfound penchant for big numbers and blatantly average quarterbacks throwing for 4,000 yards a year.  The MLB has had a similar quandary as well.  As the steroid era came to a close, runs became a premium for ball clubs.  New commissioner Rob Manfred even went as far as to publically ponder eliminating defensive shifts, which have become a brilliant analytical development over the past five years.  Though drastic and most likely implausible, the statement in it of itself shows the league’s commitment to shifting the balance of power towards its hitters.  (more…)